Welcome

Welcome to 3d Electronic Circuits .com.

We are going to be bringing some new concepts to the world of electronics here and are also going to be covering the more general electronic theories and circuits.

My basic theory for building true 3d electronic circuits can be found on “The Theory” page.

I am also hoping to be able to provide you with some electronic designing and project kits.

Keep checking back as this site is brand new and it does take some time to get some content up.

Portable Arduino Bot lets you test ideas on the go

As you experiment with Arduino boards and programming, you’ll likely have ideas that you want to test right now. Unfortunately, you can’t always have the entire project with you to try out. With that in mind, Khang Nguyen has designed the Portable Arduino Bot.

This sci-fi-inspired device packs an Arduino Nano inside, along with an on/off switch, a microswitch, three LEDs, and a LiPo battery for power. To protect these components, the bot features a nice 3D-printed enclosure, complete with foldable feet that make it look like a small robot or even spaceship. 

While it won’t replace all the tools you have at home, it appears to be a great way to carry out testing, and as shown in the videos below, to play sounds with the addition of a buzzer!

Intuitive Arduino clock has seven alarms and three LED displays

Alarm clocks of old—and certainly many of those today—require several button pushes to set things up properly. Maker Michael Wessel, however, decided to implement his own take on a more intuitive clock, creating a device that features three separate eight-digit seven-segment LED panels. Eight buttons allow for direct manipulation of each of the digits, with their own dedicated LEDs.

The info on display includes time and date, as well as temperature, and it can even show how many days, hours, or minutes have passed since a special pre-programmed day. Up to seven audible alarms are available, which can be silenced by a loud noise (e.g. clapping your hands) via a sound sensor. 

The clock is controlled via an Arduino Mega, along with an RTC module to keep things accurate.

I remember I always had to set all digital clocks for my grandparents in the ’80s — these clocks and watches always required some complicated button juggling! So, here it is: a DIY LED alarm clock that my grandparents would have been able to set and use without my help! 

An Arduino-based LED clock with 7 individual alarms, highly intuitive user interface, temperature display, and display of days / hours / minutes passed since a special date, e.g., your birthday. An active / ringing alarm can be disabled by making a loud noise, e.g., by clapping your hands. Timer-based PWM sound output for alarm melodies. 

The Arduino’s EEPROM is being used to store the alarms of course, and the DS3231 RTC is battery backed up, so it survives a temporary power outage and you won’t be late for work the next morning. 

This was put together rather quickly, thanks to off the shelf components, Velcro and existing Arduino libraries for them! The clock can be built for about $30 – 40. 

Let KamuiCosplay Help You Get Started Making Armor From Foam

Making armor from foam, often referred to as “foamsmithing” is a popular area of cosplay exploration. Foam happens to be perfect, you can mold it to shape and age it to look like hard, battleworn armor, but it is lightweight and easy to work with. KamuiCosplay is here to help […]

Read more on MAKE

The post Let KamuiCosplay Help You Get Started Making Armor From Foam appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

Playback your favourite records with Plynth

Use album artwork to trigger playback of your favourite music with Plynth, the Raspberry Pi–powered, camera-enhanced record stand.

Plynth Demo

This is “Plynth Demo” by Plynth on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.

Record playback with Plynth

Plynth uses a Raspberry Pi and Pi Camera Module to identify cover artwork and play the respective album on your sound system, via your preferred streaming service or digital library.

As the project’s website explains, using Plynth is pretty simple. Just:

  • Place a n LP, CD, tape, VHS, DVD, piece of artwork – anything, really – onto Plynth
  • Plynth uses its built-in camera to scan and identify the work
  • Plynth starts streaming your music on your connected speakers or home stereo system

As for Plynth’s innards? The stand houses a Raspberry Pi 3B+ and Camera Module, and relies on “a combination of the Google Vision API and OpenCV, which is great because there’s a lot of documentation online for both of them”, states the project creator, Jono Matusky, on Reddit.

Other uses

Some of you may wonder why you wouldn’t have your records with your record player and, as such, use that record player to play those records. If you are one of these people, then consider, for example, the beautiful Damien Rice LP I own that tragically broke during a recent house move. While I can no longer play the LP, its artwork is still worthy of a place on my record shelf, and with Plynth I can still play the album as well.

In addition, instead of album artwork to play an album, you could use photographs, doodles, or type to play curated playlists, or, as mentioned on the website, DVDs to play the movies soundtrack, or CDs to correctly select the right disc in a disc changer.

Convinced or not, I think what we can all agree on is that Plynth is a good-looking bit of kit, and at Pi Towers look forward to seeing where they project leads.

The post Playback your favourite records with Plynth appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

Cool Crowdfunding: Private Smart Speakers, Modular Fabrication Systems, and Sewing Circuits

We receive so many pitches for crowdfunding projects. They pour into our inbox daily. Since crowdfunding is a bit of a gamble, it is always kind of hard to determine just how to write about these projects, considering that many of them may not ever deliver. Cool Crowdfunding is our […]

Read more on MAKE

The post Cool Crowdfunding: Private Smart Speakers, Modular Fabrication Systems, and Sewing Circuits appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

New Products 6/5/19 Featuring SPIDriver by Excamera Labs! #adafruit @Adafruit #newproducts

Browse through all that’s new here!


NEW PRODUCTS THIS WEEK


Mini Oval Speaker with Short Wires – 8 Ohm 1 Watt: Hear the good news! This wee speaker is a great addition to any audio project where you need 8 ohm impedance and 1W or less of power. We particularly like this speaker as it is small and comes with nice skinny wires with a connector on the end. It has a handy “Molex PicoBlade” 1.25mm pitch 2-pin cable, which makes plugging into a board easy. Or you can cut off the connector and just solder/clamp onto the wires directly.

Read more


Lithium Ion Polymer Battery with Short Cable – 3.7V 350mAh: Lithium ion polymer (also known as ‘lipo’ or ‘lipoly’) batteries are thin, light and powerful. The output ranges from 4.2V when completely charged to 3.7V. This battery has a capacity of 350mAh for a total of about 1.3 Wh.

Read more


Lithium Ion Polymer Battery with Short Cable – 3.7V 420mAh: Lithium ion polymer (also known as ‘lipo’ or ‘lipoly’) batteries are thin, light and powerful. The output ranges from 4.2V when completely charged to 3.7V. This battery has a capacity of 420mAh for a total of about 1.55 Wh

Read more


Micro Servo Arm and Horn Set: If you bought a servo from us you probably got a bunch of plastic add-ons that you can snap onto the rotating part of the servo. These are called ‘servo horns’. For many robotics projects you’ll end up drilling or gluing to the horns to attach it to your armatures. But maybe you messed up, or you want to recycle the expensive motor part? This product comes with just the horns! No servo is included, so you can reuse the motors you’ve got.

Read more


Standard Servo Arm and Horn Set – 25 Spline: If you bought a servo from us you probably got a bunch of plastic add-ons that you can snap onto the rotating part of the servo. These are called ‘servo horns’. For many robotics projects you’ll end up drilling or gluing to the horns to attach it to your armatures. But maybe you messed up, or you want to recycle the expensive motor part? This product comes with just the horns! No servo is included, so you can reuse the motors you’ve got.

They mate with 25-tooth servo axles. We’ve found they’re compatible with our standard-size servo motors

Read more


Brass Heat-Set Inserts for Plastic – M3 x 4mm – 50 pack: Wanna improve the connection strength between your project’s 3D-printed parts, and also have nice clean surfaces? Instead of gluing bits together, or screwing plastic screws directly into your 3D prints, use strong and reusable machine screws and heat-set inserts. Heat set inserts are only a few cents a piece and have a grooved outside, with threads on the inside. Originally they were designed for injection molded parts but they work fabulously for 3D printed plastic as well.

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Brass Heat-Set Inserts for Plastic – M3 x 3mm – 50 pack: You could use a plain soldering iron to try to heat-press these in – Heat up the iron and use it to press the insert in, wait for it to cool, then use like a hex nut that’s embedded inside the plastic. We strongly recommend our heat-set insert tool for soldering irons because it’s really hard to insert them straight otherwise and you risk damaging your print!

Read more


Plastic Micro Servo Adapter for LEGO Cross – 16mm long: Who doesn’t love LEGO and compatible bricks? Nobody! Except when we accidentally step on them. There are soooo many mechanical things one can make with those ubiquitous bricks, plates, gears, pulleys. Say a 13-meter high LEGO London Tower Bridge…

But what do you do when you want to add LEGO-compatible bricks and parts to your servo arms and horns? This is the adapter you need! Just push the axle housing end onto the shaft of your Micro Servo, and it’s ready to adapt to the standard LEGO-compatible cross axle parts, including gears and wheels. So easy, we think this will enable many creative endeavors.

Comes 1 x per order – fits our Micro Servo only! Not guaranteed to fit with any other kind of servo splines, and definitely doesn’t fit our standard servos.

Read more


2CDriver by Excamera Labs: I²CDriver is an easy-to-use, open source tool for controlling I²C devices and a great tool to help with quick driver development and debugging. It works with Windows, Mac, and Linux, and has a built-in color screen that shows a live “dashboard” of all the I²C activity. It uses a standard FTDI USB serial chip to talk to the PC, so no special drivers need to be installed. The board includes a separate 3.3 V supply with voltage and current monitoring. It’s kinda like a Bus Pirate with a display and great Python support.

Read more


SPIDriver by Excamera Labs: SPIDriver is an easy-to-use tool for controlling SPI devices and a great tool to help with quick driver development and debugging. It works with Windows, Mac, and Linux, and has a built-in color screen that shows a live logic-analyzer display of all SPI traffic. It uses a standard FTDI USB serial chip to talk to the PC, so no special drivers need to be installed. The board includes 3.3 and 5 V supplies with voltage and current monitoring. It’s kinda like a Bus Pirate with a display and great Python support.

Read more


New Products 6/5/19 Featuring SPIDriver by Excamera Labs! #adafruit

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DIY inline refractometer

IMG_5917-e1558198198165-768x1152

DIY inline refractometer project from Anfractuosity:

The idea of this project is to image the refractometer output, then convert the position of the blue line, to a digital reading, using image processing. The idea is to measure the brix of wort during mash and sparging, so that sparging can be stopped around 1.010 SG, to avoid tannins.

More details on Anfractuosity blog.

Check out the video after the break.

Uncovering the Silicon: ?L914

At the 2018 Bay Area Maker Faire, our project Uncovering the Silicon showed off a number of simple and complex integrated circuits (with rather large feature size) under the microscope. We had a great time helping visitors look at the features and get a glimpse of what’s inside those black box integrated circuit packages. To take this to the next level for this year’s Maker Faire, we decided to try and close the loop; to take one simple integrated circuit and elucidate its workings well enough that visitors to our booth will be able to see every single component of the circuit, understand their function, and relate it to the macroscopic behavior of the chip. For this, we picked what turns out to be a rather obscure chip: the Fairchild ?L914, which is a dual 2-input NOR gate. This chip belongs to the resistor–transistor logic (RTL) family.

uL914 IC closeup in circuit

Here’s what the chip looks like. It’s in a funny old “glob-top” can package with eight leads.

pinout

Here’s the pinout; there are two NOR gates in the chip, plus power and ground.

uL914 IC package circuit with switches and LEDs

Ken Shirriff built a circuit with the chip to demonstrate its functionality. When we push either of the two buttons for one of the gates, that LED will turn off.

Schematic

Here’s the schematic diagram, adapted from the original datasheet. If you look at the left side, if either of those inputs goes high, the transistor pulls the output low.

uL914 dual 2-input NOR gate die photo

John McMaster decapped a few of the chips and sent us a die photo. He made a video about the process — no small feat. We’ll be bringing one of these bare chips and a microscope (equipped with both eyepieces and a camera) to Maker Faire.

For the macroscopic scale, we approached visualizing this circuit from a couple of angles: the physical structure of the chip, and the electronic structure of the circuit.

uL914 die model render

Eric Schlaepfer used the die photo to model the structure of the chip in CAD.

uL914 PCB version

Simultaneously, Ken designed a printed circuit board version for use with discrete components that maintained the same structure as the IC.

Individual transistor acrylic model Individual transistor acrylic model

Working from Eric’s CAD model, we built a single NPN transistor model from layers of colored acrylic. If you lift it up, and look through the transparent middle layers, you can tell that the emitter (red) is embedded into the top of the base (yellow) and does not go all the down way through it. (Transistors like these are planar: The emitter is above the base, and the base is above the collector.)

The top layer of this little model has labels for the collector, emitter and base. It is removable so that the layers of the model can be more easily inspected.

The model of the chip die includes a transparent cover representing the oxide layer, and that supports the metal layer with the wire bond pads on the edges.

One of the reasons that this particular chip is educational to look at is that there are a few unused components on the die. There are two unused transistors: one of them is unconnected, and the other is shorted. There are also several unused resistors (resistors are the dogbone shapes). The unconnected and unused components are easier to see, and provide a visual example that is useful for understanding what the connected components look like under the metal layer.

It is also fun to imagine what other circuits could have been made with different connections.

We glued most of the layers together, but left the top two layers removable so that it is easier to see the internal structure when the top is removed.

(Aside: we left out most of the epitaxial pocket material, because even though we used transparent acrylic to represent it, the layers of the components are much more visible without it present.)

Acrylic chip model top with metal layer

There are cutouts in the oxide layer where the metal layer connects to the circuitry below.

Acrylic chip model with hot glue bond wire example

One of the most noticeable things you see when you look at this type of IC under the microscope is the bond wires. We’ve used silver glitter hot glue sticks to represent them.

bond wire closeup

The glob of melted glue represents where the wire is bonded to the pad.

Acrylic chip model with hot glue bond wires

When you look straight down on the model with its glitter bond wires, it looks very similar to what you’ll see in the microscope.

Acrylic model legend

To round things out for our acrylic model, we made a physical legend to make it easier to identify all of the parts of the model.

uL914 discrete version switch and LED circuit

Once Ken got his PCBs back from our friends at OSHPark, he built it up with the same example circuit.

discrete circuit closeup

The PCBs turned out beautifully, and it’s great to see the familiar discrete packages on the enlarged circuit. Ken has published the PCB design on Github.

We hope to see you at Maker Faire this weekend!

Bonus: Ken laid out some hypothetical alternate metal layers to use the same die to create different chips.

Yuri 3 rover | The MagPi #82

In honour of the 50th anniversary of the Apollo moon landing, this year’s Pi Wars was space-themed. Visitors to the two-day event — held at the University of Cambridge in March — were lucky enough to witness a number of competitors and demonstration space-themed robots in action.

Yuri 3 rover

Among the most impressive was the Yuri 3 mini Mars rover, which was designed, lovingly crafted, and operated by Airbus engineer John Chinner. Fascinated by Yuri 3’s accuracy, we got John to give us the inside scoop.

Airbus ambassador

John is on the STEM Ambassador team at Airbus and has previously demonstrated its prototype ExoMars rover, Bridget (you can drool over images of this here: magpi.cc/btQnEw), including at the BBC Stargazing Live event in Leicester. Realising the impressive robot’s practical limitations in terms of taking it out and about to schools, John embarked on a smaller but highly faithful, easily transportable Mars rover. His robot-building experience began in his teens with a six-legged robot he took along to his technical engineering apprenticeship interview and had walk along the desk. Job deftly bagged, he’s been building robots ever since.

Inside the Yuri 3 Mars rover

Yuri is a combination of an Actobotics chassis based on one created by Beatty Robotics plus 3D-printed wheels and six 12 V DC brushed gears. Six Hitec servo motors operate the steering, while the entire rover has an original Raspberry Pi B+ at its heart.

Yuri 3 usually runs in ‘tank steer’ mode. Cannily, the positioning of four of its six wheels at the corners means Yuri 3’s wheels can each be turned so that it spins on the spot. It can also ‘crab’ to the side due to its individually steerable wheels.

Servo motors

The part more challenging for home users is the ‘gold thermal blanket’. The blanket ensures that the rover can maintain working temperature in the extreme conditions found on Mars. “I was very fortunate to have a bespoke blanket made by the team who make them for satellites,” says John. “They used it as a training exercise for the apprentices.”

John has made some bookmarks from the leftover thermal material which he gives away to schools to use as prizes.

Yuri 3 rover thermal blanket samples

Rover design

While designing Yuri 3, it probably helped that John was able to sneak peeks of Airbus’s ExoMars prototypes being tested at the firm’s Mars Yard. (He once snuck Yuri 3 onto the yard and gave it a test run, but that’s supposed to be a secret!) Also, says John, “I get to see the actual flight rover in its interplanetary bio clean room”.

A young girl inspects the Yuri 3 Mars rover

His involvement with all things Raspberry Pi came about when he was part of the Astro Pi programme, in which students send code to two Raspberry Pi devices aboard the International Space Station every year. “I did the shock, vibration, and EMC testing on the actual Astro Pi units in Airbus, Portsmouth,” John proudly tells us.

A very British rover

As part of the European Space Agency mission ExoMars, Airbus is building and integrating the rover in Stevenage. “What a fantastic opportunity for exciting outreach,” says John. “After all the fun with Tim Peake’s Principia mission, why not make the next British astronaut a Mars rover? … It is exciting to be able to go and visit Stevenage and see the prototype rovers testing on the Mars Yard.”

The Yuri 3 Mars rover

John also mentions that he’d love to see Yuri 3 put in an appearance at the Raspberry Pi Store; in the meantime, drooling punters will have to build their own Mars rover from similar kit. Or, we’ll just enjoy John’s footage of Yuri 3 in action and perhaps ask very nicely if he’ll bring Yuri along for a demonstration at an event or school near us.

John wrote about the first year of his experience building Yuri 3 on his blog. And you can follow the adventures of Yuri 3 over on Twitter: @Yuri_3_Rover.

Read the new issue of The MagPi

This article is from today’s brand-new issue of The MagPi, the official Raspberry Pi magazine. Buy it from all good newsagents, subscribe to pay less per issue and support our work, or download the free PDF to give it a try first.

Cover of The MagPi issue 82

The post Yuri 3 rover | The MagPi #82 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.

We Just Couldn’t Resist…

From time to time, we design posters around basic electronics concepts for our beginner tutorials, and our latest addition is all about resistors. Go ahead and fill out the form, and we’ll send you an email with a link to the download. Head to your nearest Kinkos or Staples, and print out this high-resolution, 24″x36″ poster to spruce up your workspace. Enjoy!

hs.button
color: #fff !important;
background-color: #e0311d !important;
border-color: #c92c1a !important;
font-weight: 700 !important;
font-family: SparkGauge,”Arial Narrow”,”Helvetica Neue”,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif !important;
letter-spacing: .1em !important;

&nbsp

Field Guide to Resistors

hbspt.forms.create(
portalId: “2224003”,
formId: “3ce178d7-75dc-41c0-b195-c902cea3ec63”
);

&nbsp

Did you know we have resistors with thicker leads?

Commonly used in breadboards and other prototyping applications, these resistors make excellent pull-ups, pull-downs and current limiters. These thick-lead versions of the resistors fit snugly into a breadboard with very little movement, so you should have few to no issues using them in your next project!


Resistor 330 Ohm 1/4 Watt PTH - 20 pack (Thick Leads)

added to your cart!


Resistor 330 Ohm 1/4 Watt PTH – 20 pack (Thick Leads)

In stock


PRT-14490

These are your run-of-the-mill 1/4 Watt, +/- 5% tolerance PTH resistors. Commonly used in breadboards and other prototyping a…


$0.95


Resistor 10K Ohm 1/4 Watt PTH - 20 pack (Thick Leads)

added to your cart!


Resistor 10K Ohm 1/4 Watt PTH – 20 pack (Thick Leads)

In stock


PRT-14491

These are your run-of-the-mill 1/4 Watt, +/- 5% tolerance PTH resistors. Commonly used in breadboards and other prototyping a…


$1.20


Resistor 100 Ohm 1/4 Watt PTH - 20 pack (Thick Leads)

added to your cart!


Resistor 100 Ohm 1/4 Watt PTH – 20 pack (Thick Leads)

In stock


PRT-14493

These are your run-of-the-mill 1/4 Watt, +/- 5% tolerance PTH resistors. Commonly used in breadboards and other prototyping a…


$1.20


Resistor 1K Ohm 1/4 Watt PTH - 20 pack (Thick Leads)

added to your cart!


Resistor 1K Ohm 1/4 Watt PTH – 20 pack (Thick Leads)

In stock


PRT-14492

These are your run-of-the-mill 1/4 Watt, +/- 5% tolerance PTH resistors. Commonly used in breadboards and other prototyping a…


$0.95


Resistor 1M Ohm 1/4 Watt PTH - 20 pack (Thick Leads)

added to your cart!


Resistor 1M Ohm 1/4 Watt PTH – 20 pack (Thick Leads)

In stock


PRT-14494

These are your run-of-the-mill 1/4 Watt, +/- 5% tolerance PTH resistors. Commonly used in breadboards and other prototyping a…

$0.95

$0.50

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